How to be able to think at work (seriously)

Our business, like most, is bottom-line driven. But our business is also SMART goal-driven, and that might not be like most others. (SMART goals = goals that are specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and timed)

We spend a considerable amount of time each Fall preparing company, division, and individual employee SMART goals to improve our bottom line year over year. Then January 1 comes along, and I find people spending time working (very hard and in a very focused way) on the most random things.

What on earth happened to the SMART goals?

There are countless distractions during the day. I get it. Fires need to be put out! Emails need to be answered! We have standing meetings and calls!

But often, this is not actual work. I encourage people to block out their calendars to get actual work done. Brain work. Not busy work. I didn’t hire people to answer emails. I hired people to come up with some solutions and best practices and new protocols. I hired people to ask the right questions, and get us closer to solutions.

I hired people to think.

And there is little to no accommodation in today’s business world for people to just think.

Here’s what happens when people carve out time in their calendars to think: the actions that result are actually pretty straightforward and efficient. People don’t need an hour meeting. They need a 20 minute meeting. People don’t waste time on email going back and forth on an issue. They make an actual decision on something.

Have we forgotten how to think? How to brainstorm? How to structure our days? Has the calendar full of meetings that anyone can drop something into made us a collective Sisyphus? Yes.

So here’s how to think at work:

  1. Book it. Block out the calendar for this. And respect the time you allocated.
  2. Frame it. Ground yourself in what to think about. What is the problem or issue? What is your objective today?
  3. Start broadly. People don’t brainstorm these days! What a pity. There is value – and potentially the best answer to the question – in starting with a sky’s the limit attitude. You can narrow things down later. Don’t fear the brainstorming process! And don’t dismiss or scoff at it.
  4. Organize. Sort out what is not relevant, and put it in a parking lot. (Hey! It may be useful later for something else.) Don’t know whether an idea is relevant? See #2. With whatever is left, start grouping ideas together. Are some ideas really variations on a theme? Are some ideas steps in a singular process? Are other ideas related, but not specific to today’s objective?
  5. Land on something. Chances are, the brainstorming and organizing have resulted in a coalition of ideas that serve today’s objective. Still seeing disparate concepts? Go back and organize more. Not enough content to work with? Go all the way back to brainstorming.

And that’s how you think at work. After that, the actions come:

  1. Write it out. People usually start here. They open up a new email, or they create a new Word document and start typing. They type and type and type… and stop when they get a little stuck. Next time, don’t. Only take pen to paper (or keyboard to email) in a structured way after this exercise.
  2. Proofread. Always. Who doesn’t re-read that email before hitting Send? Change it if you need to. But only read it once. Catch your “will” that was supposed to be “won’t” but then hit Send, for goodness’ sake! The amount of time it takes to get it just right often doesn’t result in better outcomes. Move it forward.

The first 5 steps are the way people and a company can actually meet their SMART goals. The last 2 steps are not how you work; writing and sending something are only the mechanics. Actual work is often brain work, and like anything else, it requires time and space to do it.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s